the view from Corinth

Telegraph Wires, 1925-1928, Tina Modotti

Telegraph Wires1925-1928, Tina Modotti

(Source: secretcinema1)

Ilse Bing: Kloster Reichenau am Bodensee, 1929

Ilse Bing: Kloster Reichenau am Bodensee, 1929

Guide to books by Roberto Bolaño (the English versions)

If you have never read Bolaño and don’t know where to start, first read:

Last Evenings on Earth
The Return
Distant Star

From there you can either read the two books of length:

The Savage Detectives
2666

Or read and reread:

Chile By Night
Nazi Literature in the Americas

Highly enjoyable, a collection of non-fiction essays:

Between Parentheses

Enjoyable still:
The Woes of the True Policeman
The Third Reich
The Skating Rink

If you haven’t gotten enough:

Antwerp
Amulet
Monsieur Pain

Last night I dreamed about you. What happened in detail I can hardly remember; all I know is that we kept merging into one another. I was you, you were me. Finally you somehow caught fire.

—Franz Kafka

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via burnedshoes)

"I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we’re reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? So that it will make us happy, as you write? Good Lord, we would be happy precisely if we had no books, and the kind of books that make us happy are the kind we could write ourselves if we had to. But we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us. That is my belief."

- Franz Kafka January of 1904 in a letter to Oskar Pollak

blastedheath:

Jean Pougny [Ivan Puni] (Russian, 1894-1956), Dining Room. Pencil, coloured pencil, ink and collage on paper, 31.5 x 21 cm.

blastedheath:

Jean Pougny [Ivan Puni] (Russian, 1894-1956), Dining Room. Pencil, coloured pencil, ink and collage on paper, 31.5 x 21 cm.

(via biancolatte)